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Role of native thiol, total Thiol and dynamic Disulphide in diagnosis of patient with prostate cancer and prostatitis

Vol. 45 (x): 2019 January 1.[Ahead of print]

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2018.0469


ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Mehmet Solakhan 1, Hulya Cicek 2, Nuri Orhan 2, Mustafa Yildirim 3, 4
1 Department of Urology, Medicalpark Gaziantep Hospital, Bahçeşehir University School of Medicine, Gaziantep, Turkey; 2 Department of Medical Biochemistry, Medicalpark Gaziantep Hospital, Gaziantep, Turkey; 3 Department of Internal Medicine, Medicalpark Gaziantep Hospital, Bahçeşehir University School of Medicine, Gaziantep, Turkey; 4 Department Medical Oncology, Medicalpark Gaziantep Hospital, Bahçeşehir University School of Medicine, Gaziantep, Turkey

ABSTRACT

Background: Our study investigates whether Native Thiol, Total Thiol and disulphide levels measured in serum of patients with prostate cancer and prostatitis and of healthy subjects, have any role in differential diagnosis.

Materials and Methods: Patients followed up for histopathologically verified diagnosis of prostate cancer and prostatitis in 2016-2017 at the Medicalpark Gaziantep Hospital Urology Clinic were included in the study. Native Thiol (NT), Total Thiol (TT), Dynamic Disulphide (DD) levels in serum were measured by a novel automated method.

Results: NT, TT, DD, NT / TT ratios, DD / TT ratio and DD / NT ratio were measured as 118.4 ± 36.8μmoL / L, 150.3 ± 45.3μmoL / L, 15.9 ± 7μmoL / L, 78.8 ± 7μmoL / L, 10.5 ± 3.5μmoL / L, 13.8 ± 5.8μmoL / L respectively in patients with prostate cancer; as 116.4 ± 40.5μmoL / L, 147.5 ± 50.1μmoL / L, 15.5 ± 8.7μmoL / L, 79.7 ± 9μmoL / L, 10.1 ± 4.5μmoL / L, 13.5 ± 7.2μmoL / L in patients with prostatitis and as 144.1 ± 21.2μmoL / L, 191 ± 32.3μmoL / L, 23.4 ± 10.1μmoL / L, 76.1 ± 98.3μmoL / L, 11.9 ± 4.1μmoL / L, 16.4 ± 6.9μmoL / L in healthy subjects. Significant difference was detected...

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Trends in renal calculus composition and 24-hour urine analyses in patients with neurologically derived musculoskeletal deficiencies

Vol. 45 (x): 2019 January 1.[Ahead of print]

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2018.0531


ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Lee A. Hugar 1, Ilan Kafka 2, Thomas W. Fuller 1, Hassan Taan 1, Timothy D. Averch 1, Michelle J. Semins 1
1 Department of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2 Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To better characterize metabolic stone risk in patients with neurologically derived musculoskeletal deficiencies (NDMD) by determining how patient characteristics relate to renal calculus composition and 24-hour urine parameters.

Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with neurologically derived musculoskeletal deficiencies presenting to our multidisciplinary Kidney Stone Clinic. Patients with a diagnosis of NDMD, at least one 24-hour urine collection, and one chemical stone analysis were included in the analysis. Calculi were classified as primarily metabolic or elevated pH. We assessed in clinical factors, demographics, and urine metabolites for differences between patients who formed primarily metabolic or elevated pH stones.

Results: Over a 16-year period, 100 patients with NDMD and nephrolithiasis were identified and 41 met inclusion criteria. Thirty percent (12 / 41) of patients had purely metabolic calculi. Patients with metabolic calculi were significantly more likely to be obese (median body mass index 30.3kg / m2 versus 25.9kg / m2), void spontaneously (75% vs. 6.9%), and have low urine volumes (100% vs. 69%). Patients who formed elevated pH stones were more likely to have positive preoperative urine cultures with urease splitting organisms (58.6% vs. 16.7%) and be hyperoxaluric and hypocitraturic on 24-hour urine analysis (37mg / day and 265mg / day versus 29mg / day and 523mg / day).

Conclusions:...

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Impact of time from biopsy to surgery on complications, functional and oncologic outcomes following radical prostatectomy

Vol. 45 (x): 2019 January 1.[Ahead of print]

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2018.0196


ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Mary E. Westerman 1, Vidit Sharma 1, George C. Bailey 1, Stephen A. Boorjian 1, Igor Frank 1, Matthew T. Gettman, R. Houston Thompson 1, Matthew K. Tollefson 1, Robert Jeffrey Karnes 1
1 Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA

ABSTRACT

Introduction: To determine the impact of time from biopsy to surgery on outcomes following radical prostatectomy (RP) as the optimal interval between prostate biopsy and RP is unknown.

Material and methods: We identified 7, 350 men who underwent RP at our institution between 1994 and 2012 and had a prostate biopsy within one year of surgery. Patients were grouped into five time intervals for analysis: ≤ 3 weeks, 4-6 weeks, 7-12 weeks, 12-26 weeks, and > 26 weeks. Oncologic outcomes were stratified by NCCN disease risk for comparison. The associations of time interval with clinicopathologic features and survival were evaluated using multivariate logistic and Cox regression analyses.

Results: Median time from biopsy to surgery was 61 days (IQR 37, 84). Median follow-up after RP was 7.1 years (IQR 4.2, 11.7) while the overall perioperative complication rate was 19.7% (1,448/7,350). Adjusting for pre-operative variables, men waiting 12-26 weeks until RP had the highest likelihood of nerve sparing (OR: 1.45, p = 0.02) while those in the 4-6 week group had higher overall complications (OR: 1.33, p = 0.01). High risk men waiting more than 6 months had higher rates of biochemical recurrence (HR: 3.38, p = 0.05). Limitations include the retrospective design.

Conclusions: Surgery in the 4-6 week time period after biopsy is associated with higher complications. There appears to be increased biochemical recurrence rates in delaying RP after biopsy, for men with...

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Initial experience of video endoscopic inguinal Lymphadenectomy in a center located at northeast brazilian region

Vol. 45 (x): 2019 January 1.[Ahead of print]

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2018.0521


ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Aurus Dourado Meneses ¹, Pablo Aloisio Lima Mattos ¹, Walberto Monteiro Neiva Eulálio Filho 2 , Taíla Sousa de Moura Fé 3, Rodolfo Myronn de Melo Rodrigues 2, Marcos Tobias-Machado 4
1 Divisão de Urologia, Hospital São Marcos, Teresina, PI, Brasil; 2 Universidade Federal do Piaui, Teresina, PI, Brasil; 3 Centro Universitário Uninovafapi, Teresina, PI, Brasil; 4 Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP, Brasil

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Video endoscopic inguinal lymphadenectomy – VEIL – has emerged as an alternative to reduce post-surgical complications (PSC) in patients with penile cancer submitted to inguinal lymphadenectomy (IL). In some series, these PSC are observed in more than 50% of patients. The objectives of the present study are to describe the initial experience of VEIL in a Hospital in Teresina, PI, Brazil, and to analyze PSC incidence.

Material and Methods: Retrospective descriptive study of patients submitted to VEIL from March 2014 to November 2015. Data were collected regarding surgical time, bleeding, complications, lymph node number, conversion, global complications, drainage time, cellulitis, lymphocele, cutaneous necrosis, miocutaneous necrosis and hospitalization time.

Results: 20 lower limbs of 11 patients were operated. Mean age was 51.4 (24-72) years. Mean surgical time was 85 (60-120) minutes. No patient showed intrasurgical complications, bleeding > 50 mL or conversion. Three surgeries evolved with lower limb edema, 2 with lymphoceles and one patient had cutaneous necrosis and another bulging of surgical wound. Mean time of hospitalization was 4 (2-11) days. A mean of 5.8 (1-12) lymph nodes were dissected in each surgery.

Conclusion: VEIL is a...

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Clinicopathological characteristics of surgically treated localized renal masses in patients previously exposed to chemotherapy

Vol. 45 (x): 2019 January 1.[Ahead of print]

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2018.0126


ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Efrat Tsivian 1, Matvey Tsivian 1, Christina Sze 1, Ariel Schulman 1, Thomas J. Polascik 1
1 Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To explore the potential association between renal mass characteristics and a history of chemotherapy.

Materials and methods: A retrospective review of records of patients surgically treated for a localized renal mass between 2000 and 2012 was undertaken following an institutional review board approval. Patients age and sex, renal mass clinical characteristics (radiological size and mode of presentation) and pathological characteristics (diagnosis, renal cell carcinoma subtype, Fuhrman grade and stage) were compared between patients with and without a history of chemotherapy, using Fisher’s exact test, Student’s t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test. A multivariate logistic analysis was performed to evaluate the independent association of chemotherapy and tumor pathology.

Results: Of the 1,038 eligible patients, 33 (3%) had a history of chemotherapy. The distribution of clinical stage, renal mass diagnosis, renal cell carcinoma subtype, Fuhrman grade, pathological stage, sex and median age were similar between the general population and the chemotherapy group. However, the latter had a higher rate of incidental presentation (P = 0.003) and a significantly smaller median radiological tumor size (P = 0.01). In a subset analysis of T1a renal cell carcinoma, the chemotherapy group presented an increased rate of high Fuhrman grade (P = 0.03). On multivariate analysis adjusted for radiological tumor size, sex and age the chemotherapy cohort had a 3.92 higher odds for high Fuhrman grade.

Conclusion: Patients with a history...

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Is moderate hypofractionation accepted as a new standard of care in north america for prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy? Survey of genitourinary expert radiation oncologists

Vol. 45 (x): 2019 January 1.[Ahead of print]

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2018.0275


ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Shearwood McClelland III 1, 2, Kiri A Sandler 3, Catherine Degnin 4, Yiyi Chen 4, Arthur Y Hung 2, Timur Mitin 2
1 Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A; 2 Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, U.S.A; 3 Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A; 4 Biostatistics Shared Resource, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, U.S.A

 

ABSTRACT

 

Introduction: Several recent randomized clinical trials have evaluated hypofractionated regimens against conventionally fractionated EBRT and shown similar effectiveness with conflicting toxicity results. The current view regarding hypofractionation compared to conventional EBRT among North American genitourinary experts for management of prostate cancer has not been investigated.

Materials and Methods: A survey was distributed to 88 practicing North American GU physicians serving on decision – making committees of cooperative group research organizations. Questions pertained to opinions regarding the default EBRT dose and fractionation for a hypothetical example of a favorable intermediate – risk prostate cancer (Gleason 3 + 4). Treatment recommendations were correlated with practice patterns using Fisher’s exact test.

Results: Forty – two respondents (48%) completed the survey. We excluded from analysis two respondents who selected radical hypofractionation with 5 – 12 fractions as a preferred treatment modality. Among the 40 analyzed respondents, 23 (57.5%) recommend conventional fractionation and 17 (42.5%) recommended moderate...

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