Video Library

Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Excision of a Retroperitoneal Ganglioneuroma

Vol. 43 (x): 2017 May 5.[Ahead of print]

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2014.0582


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Lucas Medeiros Burttet 1, Fernando Jahn da Silva Abreu 1, Gabrielle Aguiar Varaschin 1, Brasil Silva Neto 1, Milton Berger 1
1 Serviço de Urologia – Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil

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Surgical management of female paraurethral cyst with concomitant stress urinary incontinence

Vol. 43 (x): 2017 May 5.[Ahead of print]

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2014.0582


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Tarik Yonguc 1, Ibrahim Halil Bozkurt 1, Salih Polat 1, Serkan Yarimoglu 1, Ismail Gulden 1, Volkan Sen 1, Suleyman Minareci 1
1 Department of Urology, Izmir Bozyaka Training and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey

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Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for multiple (four) tumors

Vol. 43 (3): 566-566, May – June, 2017

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2015.0091


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Lessandro Curcio 1, Bruno Salama 1, Daniel Luis Pinto 1, Antonio Claudio Ahouagi 1
1 Hospital Federal Ipanema, RJ, Brasil

 

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Laparoscopic resection of prescral and obturator fossa schwannoma

Vol. 43 (3): 566-566, May – June, 2017

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2015.0091


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Marcos Tobias-Machado 1, Alexandre Kiyoshi Hidaka 1, Letícia Lumy Kanawa Sato 1, Igor Nunes Silva 1, Pablo Aloisio Lima Mattos 1, Antonio Carlos Lima Pompeo 1
1 Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo, Brasil

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Hilar Parenchymal Oversew: a novel technique for robotic partial nephrectomy hilar tumor renorrhaphy

Vol. 43 (x): 2017 March 3.[Ahead of print]

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2017.0049


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Jaya Sai S. Chavali 1, Ryan Nelson 1, Matthew J. Maurice 1, Onder Kara 1, Pascal Mouracade 1, Julien Dagenais 1, Jeremy Reese 1, Pilar Bayona 1, Georges-Pascal Haber 1, Robert J. Stein 1
1 Department of Urology, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA

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Alternative approach of a Fibroepithelial polyp

Vol. 43 (x): 2017 March 3.[Ahead of print]

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2016.0471


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Cristiano Linck Pazeto 1, Willy Baccaglini 1, Thiago Fernandes Negris Lima 1, Alexandre Gomes S. Simões 1, Sidney Glina 1
1 Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP, Brasil

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Nutcracker Syndrome: laparoscopic external stenting of the renal vein (“the shield technique”)

Vol. 43 (2): 373-373, March – April, 2017

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2015.0666


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Fernando Korkes 1, Marcel Silveira 2, Oseas Castro Neves-Neto 2, Luiz Franco Brandão 1, Marcos Tobias­-Machado 2, Nelson Wolosker 3, Felipe Nasser 4, Alexandre Maurano 5
1 Serviço de Urologia, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, SP, Brasil; 2 Departamento de Urologia, Facul­dade de Medicina ABC, SP, Brasil; 3 Serviço de Cirurgia Vascular, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, SP, Brasil; 4 Departamento de Radiologia Intervencionista, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein; 5 Departamento de Radiologia, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein

ABSTRACT

Nutcracker syndrome refers to the complex of clinical symptoms caused by the compression of the left renal vein (LRV) between the abdominal aorta and the superior mesenteric artery, leading to stenosis of the aortomesenteric portion of the LRV and dilatation of the distal portion. Hematuria, proteinuria, flank pain, varicocele and pelvic congestion may occur, occurring more frequently in young adults. Conservative management, might be the option whenever it is possible.

When surgical treatment is required, classically open surgery have been performed, with major surgeries as LRV trans­position or bypass techniques. The main caveats regards the fact that these are large and risky surgeries. Endovascular surgery with venous stent placement has gained some space as it is minimally invasive alternative. However, venous stents are associated with a high number of trombotic complications and in many cases requirement of life-long anticoa­gulants. External stenting of the LRV with this “shield technique” is a minimally invasive alternative, with good medium term results. We herein demonstrate our second experience with the technique of this surgery in a patient with 12 months.

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Robotic pyelolithotomy in a congenital pelvic kidney: side docking and robotic prostatectomy port – site approach

Vol. 43 (2): 374-374, March – April, 2017

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2016.0059


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Rawan Al-Yousef 1, Ahmad Almarzouq 2, Saad Aldousari 3
1 Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kwait; 2 Urology Unit, Department of Surgery, Mubarak Alkabir Hospital, Kuwait; 3 Urology Unit, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kwait

 

ABSTRACT

 

Introduction and Objectives: Ectopic pelvic kidneys with renal stones are challenging to treat. We report our experience in managing a case of ectopic pelvic kidney with a pelvic stone by robotic pyelolithotomy after failure of flexible ureteroscopy.

Materials and Methods: A 46-year old male with 2 months history of vague lower abdominal pain was found to have on Computed Tomography scan a left ectopic pelvic kidney with a 12mm stone in an anomalous renal pelvis. Flexible ureteroscopy failed to reach the stone twice and a 4.7 French ureteric stent was placed.

Results: Side docking was utilized with the patient in supine Trendelenburg position. Port placements were similar to robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. Docking time was 35 minutes and console time was 150 minutes. Multiple attempts failed to follow the course of the ureter to the renal pelvis. Subsequently the renal pelvis was directly opened through the mesocolon and a flexible cystoscope was used to basket the stone out. Estimated Blood Loss was <100ml. The patient was discharged 2 days postoperatively.

Conclusion: Robotic pyelolithotomy is safe and feasible for management of ectopic pelvic kidneys with pelvic stones. The use of flexible cystoscopy helped in localizing and extracting the stone in our case. Detailed understanding of patient’s anatomy helps in the success of this procedure.

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Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty in children with Horseshoe Kidney

Vol. 43 (2): 375-375, March – April, 2017

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2016.0042


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Paulo Renato Marcelo Moscardi 1, Roberto Iglesias Lopes 1, Marcos Figueiredo Mello 1, Cristovao Machado Barbosa Neto 1, Bruno Nicolino Cezarino 1, Lorena Marçalo Oliveira 1, Francisco Tibor Dénes 1, Miguel Srougi 1
1 Divisão de Urologia do Departamento de Cirurgia, Universidade de São Paulo, SP, Brasil

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Horseshoe kidney occurs in 1 per 400-800 live births and are more frequently observed in males (M:F 2:1). Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is commonly associated with horseshoe kidneys. The variable blood supply, presence of the isthmus and high insertion of the ureter contribute to this problem.

Case report: An asymptomatic 6 year-old boy presented with antenatal hydronephrosis. Ultrasonography and CT scan demonstrated left UPJO associated with a horseshoe kidney.

DMSA showed 33% of function on the left side. DTPA showed a flat curve and lack of washout. A left dismembered laparoscopic pyeloplasty was performed after identification of crossing vessels and abnormal implantation of the ureter. After one year, the child is asymptomatic. DTPA demonstrated a good washout curve.

Results: Our cohort consisted of six patients, five males and one female, with a mean age of 6 years (range 6m-17 years) and a mean follow-up of 3 years. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction was more common on the left side. Symptoms ap­peared only in 34% of the cases.

Mean operative time was 198 minutes (range 120-270 minutes). Crossing vessels were common (observed in 50% pa­tients). High implantation of ureter was seen in 67% patients and intrinsic obstruction in 83%. Surgical difficulties were found in two cases. Hospital stay was 4.3 days (3 to 6 days), with only one patient having a mild complication (pyelone­phritis). All cases had clinical and radiologic improvement.

Conclusion: Laparoscopic pyeloplasty is safe and feasible in children with UPJO in horseshoe kidneys, with good results and minimal morbidity.

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Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty in children with Horseshoe Kidney

Vol. 43 (2): 375-375, March – April, 2017

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2016.0042


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Paulo Renato Marcelo Moscardi 1, Roberto Iglesias Lopes 1, Marcos Figueiredo Mello 1, Cristovao Machado Barbosa Neto 1, Bruno Nicolino Cezarino 1, Lorena Marcalo Oliveira 1, Francisco Tibor Denes 1, Miguel Srougi 1
1 Divisão de Urologia do Departamento de Cirurgia, Universidade de São Paulo, SP, Brasil

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