Is there any association between national institutes of health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer?

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Vol. 42 (2): 346-350, March – April, 2016

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2015.0082


ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Is there any association between national institutes of health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer?
 
Omer Gokhan Doluoglu 1, Cavit Ceylan 2, Fatih Kilinc 1, Eymen Gazel 2, Berkan Resorlu 1, Oner Odabas 2

1 Department of Urology Clinic, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, , Ankara Turkey; 2 Department of Urology Clinic of Yüksek Ihtisas Training and Research Hospital, , Ankara Turkey


 

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We investigated the association between National Institutes of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer.
Materials and Methods: The data of 440 patients who had undergone prostate biopsies due to high PSA levels and suspicious digital rectal examination findings were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of accompanying NIH IV prostatitis. The exclusion criteria were as follows: Gleason score>6, PSA level>20ng/mL, >2 positive cores, >50% cancerous tissue per biopsy, urinary tract infection, urological interventions at least 1 week previously (cystoscopy, urethral catheterization, or similar procedure), history of prostate biopsy, and history of androgen or 5-alpha reductase use. All patient’s age, total PSA and free PSA levels, ratio of free to total PSA, PSA density and prostate volume were recorded.
Results: In total, 101 patients were included in the study. Histopathological examination revealed only PCa in 78 (77.2%) patients and PCa+NIH IV prostatitis in 23 (22.7%) patients. The median total PSA level was 7.4 (3.5–20.0) ng/mL in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group and 6.5 (0.6–20.0) ng/mL in the PCa group (p=0.67). The PSA level was≤10ng/mL in 60 (76.9%) patients in the PCa group and in 16 (69.6%) patients in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group (p=0.32).
Conclusions: Our study showed no statistically significant difference in PSA levels between patients with and without NIH IV prostatitis accompanying PCa.

Keywords: Prostatitis; Prostatic Neoplasms; prostate-specific antigen (146-154) [Supplementary Concept]

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