Hyberbaric oxygen as sole treatment for severe radiation – induced haemorrhagic cystitis

Vol. 43 (3): 489-495, May – June, 2017

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2016.0451


ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Athanasios Dellis 1, Athanasios Papatsoris 2, Vasileios Kalentzos 3, Charalambos Deliveliotis 2, Andreas Skolarikos 2
1 2nd Department of Surgery, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aretaieion Academic Hospital, Greece; 2 2nd Department of Urology, University of Athens, Sismanoglio General Hospital, Athens, Greece; 3 Department of Diving and Hyperbaric Oxygen, Naval and Veterans Hospital, Athens, Greece

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen as the primary and sole treatment for severe radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis.

Materials and methods: Hyperbaric oxygen was prospectively applied as primary treat­ment in 38 patients with severe radiation cystitis. Our primary endpoint was the in­cidence of complete and partial response to treatment, while the secondary endpoints included the duration of response, the correlation of treatment success-rate to the interval between the onset of haematuria and initiation of therapy, blood transfusion need and total radiation dose, the number of sessions to success, the avoidance of surgery and the overall survival.

Results: All patients completed therapy without complications with a mean follow-up of 29.33 months. Median number of sessions needed was 33. Complete and partial re­sponse rate was 86.8% and 13.2%, respectively. All 33 patients with complete response received therapy within 6 months of the haematuria onset. One patient needed cystec­tomy, while 33 patients were alive at the end of follow-up.

Conclusions: Our study suggests the early primary use of hyperbaric oxygen for radia­tion-induced severe cystitis as an effective and safe treatment option.

 Keywords: Urinary Bladder; Cystitis; Hema­turia; Oxygen Inhalation Therapy

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